Hundreds of Trucks Flock to Bloomington, Indiana for Rally Saturday Night

BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA – DECEMBER 9: A large group of trucks gathers in the parking of At Home on December 9, 2023, in Bloomington, Indiana. Police eventually cleared the truckers from the lot after someone complained. (Photo by Jeremy Hogan/The Bloomingtonian)
BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA – DECEMBER 9: A large group of trucks gathers in the parking of At Home on December 9, 2023, in Bloomington, Indiana. Police eventually cleared the truckers from the lot after someone complained. (Photo by Jeremy Hogan/The Bloomingtonian)
BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA – DECEMBER 9: A large group of trucks gathers in the parking of At Home on December 9, 2023, in Bloomington, Indiana. Police eventually cleared the truckers from the lot after someone complained. (Photo by Jeremy Hogan/The Bloomingtonian)
BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA – DECEMBER 9: A large group of trucks gathers in the parking of At Home on December 9, 2023, in Bloomington, Indiana. Police eventually cleared the truckers from the lot after someone complained. (Photo by Jeremy Hogan/The Bloomingtonian)
BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA – DECEMBER 9: A large group of trucks gathers in the parking of At Home on December 9, 2023, in Bloomington, Indiana. Police eventually cleared the truckers from the lot after someone complained. (Photo by Jeremy Hogan/The Bloomingtonian)
BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA – DECEMBER 9: A large group of trucks gathers in the parking of At Home on December 9, 2023 in Bloomington, Indiana. Police eventually cleared the truckers from the lot after someone complained. (Photo by Jeremy Hogan/The Bloomingtonian)

Staff report

Bloomington, Indiana – December 10, 2023

More than 100 trucks descended upon Bloomington, resembling a murder of crows flocking to the city Saturday night, and keeping police resources busy.

The rally was the first anniversary of a previous rally according to an announcement that was shared with the Bloomingtonian. The first rally took place on December 9, 2022.

It appears the event was organized by a group called, Hoosier Showdown, which can be found on social media:

@hoosier_showdowns

Hell od a year, big plans for next year well see yall there. #fyp #teanotcrown #trucksoverdrugs

♬ original sound – Ghost._.Media

Earlier Saturday night, police dispatches reported hundreds of vehicles gathering at Moore’s Creek boat ramp, where only one member of the Indiana Department of Resources was present. The Monroe County Sheriff’s Office went to the location to aid.

The sizable group of trucks later appeared at various locations across the town, repeatedly prompting law enforcement responses.

By 10 pm, the police were dispersing numerous modified truck enthusiasts from the parking lot of At Home on West Third Street. Some individuals stood atop their trucks while others moved in large groups. Many trucks, valued at tens of thousands of dollars and unaffordable for many, were predominantly large farm-type trucks adorned with bright LED lights capable of blinding other drivers, along with some equipped with train horns. The smell of diesel smoke permeated the parking lot. Indiana doesn’t have vehicle emissions standards. There were also some smaller trucks and a few cars.

Many trucks boasted booming stereo systems, racing wheels, and tires, with large engines generating the sounds of turbo engines throughout the parking lot.

As the Bloomingtonian approached the At Home parking lot, someone cautioned about police presence. Despite law enforcement’s efforts to clear the lot, many truckers hesitated to leave immediately. Police employed tactics reminiscent of herding sheep as at least five Bloomington police cars managed the situation.

During this time, a loud young woman vociferously protested to the Bloomingtonian about photographing the truck meet, despite its visibility from public spaces. Her aggressive outburst continued as the truck she was in sped away, shouting, “What are you taking pictures of you ‘mother fucker?’”

Apparently, according to a social media post, some people had been watching the trucks, and calling the police on them earlier in the evening. There was one report of the trucks doing burnouts. But, police were showing up to locations almost as quickly as the trucks.

More videos can be found on TikTok:

Although the rally allegedly originated in Bedford and many trucks began their return journey in that direction, some continued to roam around Bloomington.

Simultaneously, while the truck rally unfolded, law enforcement responded to at least two separate unrelated reports of shots fired—one incident occurring on North Crescent and another on 446.

A couple of readers in messages expressed they would rather see the young people gathering in parking lots with their trucks to have a community, than the alternatives. According to hashtags, the ethos of the community of truck enthusiasts seems to be anti-drugs, at a time when opioid overdoses are killing scores of Americans every year.

A hashtag on TikTok with numerous videos reads: #TrucksNotDrugs

Thousands of Americans have been dying every year as Mexican cartels and Chinese chemical dealers work together to flood American streets with deadly fentanyl. The epidemic has already claimed the lives of nearly 100 people in Monroe County over the past two years.

The rally seemed like a variation of cruising culture that began in places like Modesto California in the 50s and was highlighted in the classic film, American Graffiti, by George Lucas. Instead of having souped-up cars, the youth now have trucks.


Rate this post

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 3.7 / 5. Vote count: 62

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

Liked it? Take a second to support The Bloomingtonian on Patreon!
Become a patron at Patreon!